As an incoming speech-language pathology student, you may not be certain about what area of speech pathology you would like to go into. Speech-language pathology is a diverse field full of careers that can be tailored to your specific interests- whether your interests are a type of setting, a specific population, or a particular condition.

To help you get a taste of what is out there, we have launched a series of faculty interviews with professors from various Master’s in SLP programs so you can learn more about the work and research being done in the field. These professors have engaged in amazing research in a wide range of speech and language topics- research that is shaping the way we understand speech and how treatment for speech and language conditions evolves.

 


Dr. O'Neil-Pirozzi

Therese O’Neil-Pirozzi, ScD, CCC-SLP

Dr. O’Neil-Pirozzi is an associate professor in Bouvé College’s Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at Northeastern University. Her teaching, research, and service are clinically based and extend across the lifespan. Her areas of focus include: language and health literacy of low income families, brain neuroplasticity, and effects of brain injury on survivors and families.


Dr. PerryDr. Jamie Perry

Dr. Perry is the Department Chair and Associate Professor in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at East Carolina University. Dr. Perry’s research uses MRI and 3D computer technology to study the velopharyngeal anatomy and physiology to further understand speech variations among those with cleft palate.

 


Dr. Chiou

Dr. Hsinhuei Sheen Chiou

Hsinhuei Sheen Chiou is an Associate Professor in the Department of Speech, Hearing and Rehabilitation Services at MNSU, Mankato. Her research and clinical areas include language-cognitive communication disorders in adults with neurogenic disorders. Sheen runs Acquired Communicative and Cognitive Rehabilitation Research lab focusing on aphasia and cognitive rehabilitation.


Dr. Christine Maul of USC FresnoDr. Christine Maul

Dr. Christine Maul is an associate professor at California State University, Fresno. She is the co-author of two textbooks in the field of communicative disorders and has published peer-reviewed articles in the areas of family-centered service delivery, child language disorders, and multicultural issues. She is also the parent of a 35-year-old adult son with autism spectrum disorder, who is the inspiration for her work.


Dr. Terry BaggsDr. Terry Baggs

Dr. Baggs is Associate Professor and Co-Chair of Communication Sciences and Disorders at Abilene Christian University. He teaches neurogenic disorders and research methodology and has practiced for over 30 years in both acute-care and rehabilitation facilities. His recent research has been on the predictive value of variables for graduate school admissions and how personality relates to clinical services.


Dr. Abby HemmerichDr. Abby Hemmerich

Abby Hemmerich is an associate professor at the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire. She teaches in the areas of voice, speech science, and accent addition. Her research interests include voice therapy efficacy, vocal tremor and spasmodic dysphonia, and teaching pedagogy and student engagement.

 


Dr. Angela LosardoDr. Angela Losardo

Dr. Losardo is a Professor in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at Appalachian State University. She started the Theatre and Therapy Program, an interprofessional collaboration between the Departments of Communication Sciences and Disorders (CSD) and Theatre and Dance at Appalachian State University. 

 


Dr. Fabiano-SmithDr. Leah Fabiano-Smith

Leah Fabiano-Smith’s research focuses on phonological acquisition and disorders in bilingual Spanish-English speaking children and clinical issues related to culturally and linguistically diverse populations. Dr. Fabiano-Smith is the Director of the University of Arizona Bilingual Certificate Program in Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology.

 


Dr. Jessica CaronDr. Jessica Caron

Dr. Jessica Caron is an Assistant Professor of Communication Sciences and Disorders at Penn State University. Her work is focused on improving outcomes for learners with high-intensity needs who require AAC. More specifically her research seeks to improve poor literacy outcomes for individuals who use AAC.

 


Dr. Joy GoodDr. Joy Good

Dr. Joy Good is an Associate Professor in the Department of Communication Disorders at Arkansas State University. She has over 20 years of experience in the field –including nearly a decade as a public school-based clinician. Her research focus deals with written language issues pertaining to the school-age population.

 


Dr. Kerri PhillipsDr. Kerri Phillips

Kerri Phillips, SLP.D. is a Professor and Program Director of the Graduate Program in Speech-Language Pathology at Louisiana Tech University.  Dr. Phillips is a member and current President-Elect of the Board of Directors of the National Council of the State Boards of Examiners for Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology.

 


Dr. Lee-JamesDr. Ryan Lee-James

Ryan Lee-James, PhD, is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at Adelphi University in Garden City, NY and a speech-language pathologist certified by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. Her work contributes to the larger body of research that is focused on better understanding the impact of African American English dialect use on assessment and treatment of language disorders for children reared in poverty.

 

 


Dr. Ding

Dr. Ruiying Ding

Ruiying Ding, Ph.D., CCC-SLP is a professor at Elmhurst college’s Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders. Prior to her academic appointment, she had worked as a speech-language pathologist for five years in various clinical settings, including an acute care hospital, sub-acute rehabilitation center, long-term rehabilitation center, and pediatric outpatient clinic.